Let's Make Robots!

ignoblegnome's blog

MAKE: Jaimie and the Giant Robot

Some of you know Jaimie Mantzel and his awesome Giant Robot Project. Well, a couple of guys are putting together a documentary about him. They've already shot all the footage, but they are looking for help on post production and with film festival entry fees. Read more on MAKE...

MAKE: Robots Past and Present

Robots have been a big part of Maker Faire from the beginning. Check out Maker Faire robots from 2008 to today. Including a great video of Chris the Carpenter showing off Walter II.See more on MAKE...

MAKE: Bio-inspired Origami Folded Robots

Dash Robotics launches a fundraising campaign at Dragon Innovation for their bio-inspired origami folded robot. See more on MAKE...

MAKE: Walter II is a Machinist's Masterpiece

Chris the Carpenter's Walter II is a machinist's masterpiece! See more on MAKE...

MAKE: Concerto for Robots

Engineer, Artist and Designer Ricardo Cid's singular vision is brought to life through a kinetic sculpture where geometric robotic forms dance to music with movement choreographed in computer code. Read more at MAKE...

MAKE: Transatlantic Drone Takes to the Sea

The Scout Transatlantic project has broken the world record for the furthest distance traveled by an autonomous unmanned boat, and it is just getting started. Read more on MAKE...

Maker Faire NYC 2013

Let's Make Robots has been rocking the NYC Maker Faire since 2011. This year Chris the Carpenter will be manning the helm. I'll be helping with some planning and logistics and crap like that.

Update: 5 August 2013

Maker Faire Application

Towards a Robot Kit for Maker Faire

I'm trying to come up with a kit to build at Maker Faire NYC this year. Chris the Carpenter and I ran a series of four workshops last year, that were in high demand. The challenge is developing an inexpensive yet awesome kit that can be made in an hour by just about anyone.

After my experience teaching 9 to 10 year old kids robots with the Rocket Brand Studios Tadpole kit, I'm looking for something that is simple, simple, simple. Still, I'd like to top what we did last year.

 

Great robot shield ideas gleaned from LMR members

I just felt like commenting on how much I have learned from others on Let's Make Robots. This was recently brought home to me when I decided to build a robot shield for the Hobbybotics Hobbyduino Mini. This is a custom bare-bones Arduino compatible board created by LMR member brooksware2000

TinHead and ignoblegnome meet up in NYC

TinHead let it be known that he'd be in the NYC area this weekend following some company training. I couldn't resist the opportunity to meet him in person.

After some communications challenges, we met up in Times Square and then walked down to Bryant Park for some overpriced beer. (Drinks are pretty pricey in NYC.) We were accompanied by TinHead's four lovely co-workers, who were very nice. 

Sneak Peek: Jamie's Awesome Robot Toy

Some of you may know user Jamie, who has posted here occasionally, but spends most of his online time on his YouTube Channel. There he posts about his Giant Robot Project and other amazingly cool stuff he does.

DAGU Playful Puppy Robot Review

 

Introduction

OddBot (Russell) sent me a DAGU Playful Puppy Robot kit to check out. This little guy is really neat.

Maker Faire NYC 2011 Summary

The Let's Make Robots team had a great time at Maker Faire NYC. 

LMR received two Maker Faire Editor's Choice Blue Ribbons. One from Becky Stern and one from Chris Conners

That doesn't include blue ribbons awarded to individuals who are also LMR members, like the two given to RobotGrrl!

Review: Hobbybotics Hobbyduino Mini

 

Introduction

Brooksware2000 (Curtis) nicely sent me a couple of ATMega 328 chips flashed with the Arduino boot loaders, since I had mentioned that I wasn't set up to flash the chips I had myself. He included an Arduino clone board he made, and asked me to let him know what I thought. And so I bring you a review of the Hobbybotics Hobbyduino Mini!

Mr Loboto

I was looking at Digi01's Turbot and thinking how cool it was to have a robot that could move and react to stimuli without any software. Some poking around showed me that the original Turbot was a creation of Mark Tilden, the inventor or BEAM robotics.

BEAM stands for Biology, Electronics, Aesthetics, Mechanics. It is a style of robot making that takes it's inspiration from biology. Most BEAM robots are controlled with simple analog circuitry rather than a microcontroller.

Review: Ro-Bot-X uServotino

Introduction

Now, for the next in a series of reviews on Ro-Bot-X's boards. This one is on the beta version of the uServotino. It is an ATMEGA328 custom board with the Arduino bootloader pre-installed. 

The Kit

Ro-Bot-X's boards are usually available in three options.

Ro-Bot-X Board Reviews

 

Introduction

Recently, Ro-Bot-X send me three boards to evaluate. I had previously ordered his Robot Builder's Shield V1, and commented with some constructive feedback and a review on it after using the board for Penny.

Why Tri? A stupid way to build a robot.

This is a robot built mostly to explore how you can steer with a combination of differential rear steering and a single servo controlled front wheel. This is a stupid way to steer. Why try it? I expect I'll learn a few things. Maybe you will too.

  • Video 1: RC Turning Test
  • Video 2: Motor Driver Test
  • Video 3: Spin Turn Test
  • Video 4: Turning Mode Test
  • Video 5: Adaptive Steering Test
  • Video 6: Why Tri Sound 'n Fury!

You can also see Why Tri's robot page.


Build a brassier fly trap

I'm working on a steampunk inspired brass animatronic venus fly trap. I will call her Venux. Venux's robot page is posted, but there is more info in this blog.

What's ignoblegnome building?

Any guesses what I am building? Sound like a fun game to play?

I am anxious to hear your guesses.


Update: An easier way. 

TheAndroidMan posted a tip/walkthrough on adding pnuematics to a robot. That will make this project much easier.


Update: The answer!

How not to steer

 

I recently hacked some servos for fun, and wound up with a servo that could only turn 90 degrees. This seemed like a good candidate to use as a steering servo. I had never tried steering with a servo, but I'd seen it done. How hard could it be?

I started with my two servo-hacked, brainless gear motors with attached wheels, which I had hot glued together with a battery pack for testing.

Hacked some servos for fun

 

I had a GWS S03TXF 2BB servo that I had previously released the magic smoke from. It's been sitting on my desk, labeled "bad" for some time. I took it apart and could see that the board shows visible signs of frying.

I also had a GWS S03N STD servo that I had butched for the brains, in order to try to create a mongo-sized servo for steering YardGnome (a work in progress).

It's 4AM: Arduino SHR Coded but not built

I've been planning an Arduino version of the Start Here robot. Today most of my parts arrived from SparkFun. This bot will be based on Ro-Bot-X's Arduino Shield for building robots.

100% up to date on everything

Frits made a big deal in the shout box today after I posted that I had caught up with ALL the forum posts. He suggested I make a blog about it, so here you go, Frits!

There was a little "easter egg" suprise message that comes up when you have no unread posts.